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TUD
Humans have an extraordinary flexibility in generating movements. With little attention most of us can perform complex tasks such as walking or riding a bicycle. The central nervous system integrates available sensory information and select the proper motor command for the muscles. The skeletal system enables the transfer of forces required for body movement while the muscles produce the forces to accelerate it. Stability is maintained through both passive (intrinsic muscle properties) and active (reflexes) contributions to the visco-elasticity of the joints. In this course we investigate how humans generate movements, stabilize posture, and integrate sensory feedback into control actions, while acknowledging the kinematics and the mechanical properties of the human motor system. This course addresses fundamental aspects and clinical applications. During the course the role of subsystems (e.g. muscles, sensory systems) and their interactions as well as uncertainty in sensory signals are discussed with a focus on reaching movements and posture maintenance. During the course it will be shown how this knowledge can help in understanding impaired motor function after neurological disorders, like Stroke and Parkinson s disease.
TUD
Scientific method Human research ethics & bio-ethics Experimental design Statistics: distributions, central tendencies, t test, correlation coefficient, reliability, research bias Publishing
TUD
This course covers several widely used nonparametric methods in statistics. The topics include nonparametric estimation of distribution functions and quantile functions, goodness of fit tests, permutation and rank tests, bootstrapping methods, kernel density estimators, and nonparametric regression
TUD
In this course, students carry out projects that contribute to our insight in instrument-tissue interactions in the application of minimally invasive techniques such as needle or catheter placement. Key in this course is that students choose from a selection of current research topics in instrument-tissue interaction. You will set up your own experiment and investigate the response to your experimental manipulations. The results should allow you to draw conclusions that are relevant for the development or improvement of minimally invasive techniques. Different experimental set-ups are available for precise position control of the instruments. Often other hardware or tissue simulants need to be realized for specific experiments.
TUD
The name "Composite Trinity Exercise" is based on the fact that designing composite structures requires knowledge of production methods, materials and geometrical design. The exercise is defined in following parts: 1. Manufacturing of thermoplastic and thermoset laminates 2. Determination of fibre volume fraction, void volume fraction and density 3. Possibly C-scanning of all laminates for determination of laminate quality 4. Estimation of the maximal bending-torsion coupling for a strip of UD composite 5. Possibly manufacturing of specimens for mechanical tests, including adhesive bonding of tabs 6. Performing mechanical tests 7. Analysing the test results of the mechanical test, including failure analyses 8. Adhesion of thermoset laminates 9. Resistance welding of thermoplastic laminates 10. Possibly preparation of lap shear specimens 11. Performing lap shear tests 12. Estimation of the mechanical properties of a sandwich panel 13. Manufacturing of a sandwich panel by either vacuum infusion, pressing or vacuum bagging. 14. Performing a bending test on a sandwich panel. 15. Writing a test report.
TUD
Learn how to model real life engineering problems using Finite Element Methods. Computational methods in structural analysis are of prime importance in industry as tools to assess the efficiency and performance of structures in the field of aerospace, mechanical, civil and biomedical engineering. A combination of theoretical and practical knowledge in finite element analysis are valuable skills needed to address such problems in industry. To efficiently model a real life engineering problem using finite element analysis and predict its future behaviour, an engineer must possess a strong theoretical understanding of the finite element method (FEM) along with the understanding of the importance of verification and validation of such computational models.
TUD
Industrial ecology relies on mathematical models and involves the processing of potentially large datasets. Modelling is the art of developing a simplified description of a problem that is complex enough to capture its relevant features and yet simple enough to be manageable and yield measurable predictions. Data analysis is the art of collecting information and processing it to return meaningful visualizations and model results. The language of modelling is mathematics and the tool of data analysis is programming. Both go hand in hand and are essential skills that will help you in your life as an industrial ecologist. Throughout the course we will cover various types of models and tools and illustrate their application to problems such as: Will the world run out of oil? How many people can the earth support? Have some countries faked their GHG inventory reports? A computer language is not only an interface to control the computer, it is also an unambiguous description of the data structures and algorithms applied in research. In this course, you will learn to use the programming language Python for scientific work, especially for analysing and visualising datasets that are relevant for Industrial Ecology. You will need a laptop and Python, which is available for all operating systems. The IDE Spyder is advised, but any alternative will do.
TUD
Sensors are used in the Structures and Materials Laboratory to provide data to validate theories and models in structural analysis and materials testing. However, the reliability of the data needs to be assessed. To do this it is necessary to understand how the measurement technique works.This course provides the technical basis for you to make your own analysis of a measurement instrument and to validate the data quality. Sensors for strain, force, pressure, velocity, acceleration, temperature etc. are based on many different physical principles, including electric, magnetic, optical, acoustic and mechanical. Transducers are also connected to a measurement chain. The influence of the amplifiers, signal conditioning, A/D converters and signal processing on the measurement needs to be determined, as does the influence of noise, nonlinearity and feedback control. Finally you can determine if an experimental mechanics, non-destructive testing or structural health monitoring measurement technology is fit for purpose.
TUD
In Forensic Engineering students will get acquainted with forensic principles used in air safety investigations. The principal phases of the investigation process are explained; starting from the fact finding phase through the analysis phase and the final report phase. Examples will be shown of aircraft (serious)incidents and accidents on a case-by-case bases, highlighting different (engineering) failure modes and characteristics. During the course students will learn how to conduct an (accident) investigation and apply forensic concepts to determine the (probable)cause of the event. Finally the drafting of recommendations and its implications are looked at. Apart from theory a couple of practical group exercises are part of the program. The group exercises are aimed to apply the principles learned during the lectures and attendance is mandetory. A report of the group exercises is part of the final grade.
TUD
In many courses on (physical) metallurgy, students are taught a thermodynamic and other concepts and shown a large number of examples for existing metallic systems. For such courses a strong focus is on knowledge build-up rather than skills build-up. In contrast, the course AE4X03 aims to give the students hands-on experience in designing new metallic systems themselves, using state of the art thermodynamic software. The course consists of four lectures summarising the main concepts of thermodyamics (not only for binary alloys, but also for ternary and quaternary alloys), microstrucuture-property relations, casting and solid state processing. Relevant review papers assist the students in mastering the concepts. Each week a homework assignment test is given. The remaining weeks are spent on designing the alloy while making supervised use of the thermodynamic and other software. To this aim the students work in pairs of two on an individual design task. The examination is in the form of an oral exam in which the students present and defend a report describing the design strategy used as well as the resulting alloy composition and process route.

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